Andrew Lombardi

Excerpts on Death by Osho

Reading time: 1 minute 51 seconds

Only at the moment of death do people recognize the fact that they have not lived.

And when there was time to live, you were doing a thousand and one foolish things, wasting your time rather than living it.

So I can suggest only one thing. Now you cannot go back to your past death, but you can start doing one thing: Always be ready to move from the known to the unknown, in anything, any experience. Just jump on something that is new… its very newness, its very freshness, is so alluring. Then there is courage.

It is better, even if the unknown proves worse than the known---that is not the point.

Start by a simple exercise, and that is; always remember, whenever there is a choice choose the unknown, the risky, the dangerous, the insecure, and you will not be at a loss.

And only then — this time death can become a tremendously revealing experience.

Courage will come to you. Just start with a simple formula: never miss the unknown. Always choose the unknown and go headlong. Even if you suffer, it is worth it — it always pays. You always come out of it more grown up, more mature, more intelligent.

The Western man has been living under a very wrong conception. It has created so much tension in people’s minds that they are always on the go, and they are always worried that one never knowns when the end is coming. Before the end they want to do everything. But the result is just the opposite; they cannot even manage to do a few things gracefully, beautifully, perfectly. They cannot just sit silently for an hour, because their mind is saying to them, “why are you wasting this hour? You could have done this, you could have done that”

In the Western concept, death is the end of life. In the Eastern concept, death is only a beautiful incident in the long procession of life; there will be many, many deaths.

Guilt is not natural, it is created by religions. They have made every man guilty — guilty of a thousand and one things, so burdened with guilt that they cannot sing, they cannot dance, they cannot enjoy anything.


Written by Andrew Lombardi who lives and works in Orange County, CA.